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BUSINESS
MBOUCHI
Meknes
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8
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right or not right
06:38:28 AM Tuesday Aug 7, 2007


In Meknes, this summer, we can see some forein person takes photographs for some moroccan people (an old man, a woman or children) , and for some moroccan events (business, job, maner...). After that these photographs became postcards with
a COPYRIGHT (AWAH !!!).
Imagine, a day, you can see your father or your grand father on a POSTCARD with a big and sincere smile, wearing an original djellaba, with a Tarbouch on his head and a beautifull "BALRA" in her feet near an historic monument.
Imagine, your uncle is a ''CHFANJI"(how makes culin fritter) and one day, you see him on a POSTCARD with a copyright.
These foreins persons howm take photos for this goal (profit)are not honest, so I don't accept to find photograph's father on a POSTCARD with a COPYRIGHT.

What about you ?


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12:31 pm    August 8, 2007

hudhud message
8
hmm. sounds like a sizzling way to spend the summer.. try trimming your fur and whiskers, maybe it would help =)
·

12:28 pm    August 8, 2007
MBOUCHI
7
To hudhud : I'm burning under the sun in Meknes.
·

2:19 pm    August 7, 2007
arabie
6
I was in Morocco for the summer between juin an july with three other friends. They were all of Irianina origin but very much americanized. We had total of three cameras, one of which was a professional camera. We took more 4000 pictures. We visited most major cities of Morocco. We took some amazing pictures. However, my friend from NYC loved taking pictures of people. I love pictures of people because of the artistic effect and what it communicates through the picture. Nevertheless, there were many and I say many Moroccans who did NOT want their pictures to be taken. I was communicated the issue to my friend. She started asking for permission to take a picture as instructed. Then, later on she started taking pictures of people in the street without asking for any permission. I think that is very rude and extremely insensitive. Morocco is a touristic country but there are many poor people that don\'t want to feel like touristic objects because of their economical status. Those people were going about there business when a foreigner started taking their picture without asking for permission. Yes, those pictures will help promote the country\'s tourism sector but not at the expense of the poor people. Talking about freedom to choose. The people should have the choice to be on the picture or not. There were many encounters where a Moroccan dude went bullistic on her, I simply stood there watching her get embarassed. To my surprise, that scene had little affect on her, so she kept on taking the pictures. It\'s really a fine line to walk. I understand that she loves art because the nature of her profession, but disrespecting people is tasteless and has nothing to do with art.

Now if it were me and I discovered that someone took a picture of me without asking for my permission, I would take that fency camera with the nice big-o lense and smash it in front of that so-called photographer. Yes this may be barbaric approach, so I would actually whippe out my camera and follow that photographer everywhere and take tons of pictures of him/her. See how they like it when they\'ve had enough of the pictures.

One thing worth mentioning is I was most proud when I was in Chefchaouen or Chaouen. Those poeple are so full of pride. no beggers, no one husteling in the streets. There was a young kid, Anouar, who showed us around, and would not take any money. I had to make him eat lunch with us and shuved, literally, shuved money down into his pockets. It\'s amazing how small towns like that still kept the old Moroccan customs of hospitality and integrity. It\'s beautiful to witness. Chaouen L9dima!!!

·

2:13 pm    August 7, 2007
arabie
5
I was in Morocco for the summer between juin an july with three other friends. They were all of Irianina origin but very much americanized. We had total of three cameras, one of which was a professional camera. We took more 4000 pictures. We visited most major cities of Morocco. We took some amazing pictures. However, my friend from NYC loved taking pictures of people. I love pictures of people because of the artistic effect and what it communicates through the picture. Nevertheless, there were many and I say many Moroccans who did NOT want their pictures to be taken. I was communicated the issue to my friend. She started asking for permission to take a picture as instructed. Then, later on she started taking pictures of people in the street without asking for any permission. I think that is very rude and extremely insensitive. Morocco is a touristic country but there are many poor people that don\'t want to feel like touristic objects because of their economical status. Those people were going about there business when a foreigner started taking their picture without asking for permission. Yes, those pictures will help promote the country\'s tourism sector but not at the expense of the poor people. Talking about freedom to choose. The people should have the choice to be on the picture or not. There were many encounters where a Moroccan dude went bullistic on her, I simply stood there watching her get embarassed. To my surprise, that scene had little affect on her, so she kept on taking the pictures. It\'s really a fine line to walk. I understand that she loves art because the nature of her profession, but disrespecting people is tasteless and has nothing to do with art.

Now if it were me and I discovered that someone took a picture of me without asking for my permission, I would take that fency camera with the nice big-o lense and smash it in front of that so-called photographer. Yes this may be barbaric approach, so I would actually whippe out my camera and follow that photographer everywhere and take tons of pictures of him/her. See how they like it when they\'ve had enough of the pictures.

One thing worth mentioning is I was most proud when I was in Chefchaouen or Chaouen. Those poeple are so full of pride. no beggers, no one husteling in the streets. There was a young kid, Anouar, who showed us around, and would not take any money. I had to make him eat lunch with us and shuved, literally, shuved money down into his pockets. It\'s amazing how small towns like that still kept the old Moroccan customs of hospitality and integrity. It\'s beautiful to witness. Chaouen L9dima!!!

·

12:59 pm    August 7, 2007

hudhud message
4
it happens everywhere. I think it's cool as long as the image is respectful and not mocking or derisive. Just think - one day these postcards will serve as history and show a preservation of traditions :)
so Mbouchi you live in Meknes? what do you do there.
·

12:48 pm    August 7, 2007

Rasta Gnawi message
3
Oh yeah!.. that's it. Me3qouda. If you can find a way to put real me3qouda in a postcard and send it to me, I would myself fight to get you your copyright ;)
·

12:44 pm    August 7, 2007
MBOUCHI
2
Hi Rasta Gnawi : Thanks for you comment.
In Meknes, we call fried potatoes paste dish : MA39ouda, its delicious
·

12:05 pm    August 7, 2007

Rasta Gnawi message
1
I don't know. It doesn't seem to be different from anywhere else where pictures are made into postcards. I kind of agree with you in that some see traditionally dressed people as "funny" looking and so postcards become kind of entertaining as opposed to informative. But in reality, postcards are a marketing device that intices people to come visit the country and help tourism. A postcard says: "look, we're different... we're worth spending some time with." I think that's what it says anyway. It's not terribly offensive.

As for copyright, some might have a stronger opinion on it. I mean, as long as there was some artistic talent spent on producing the picture, it merits protection.. Ithink anyway... 2 different subjects.

What do you call that fried potatoes paste dish that you guys make in Meknes? I used to love whenever I visited my cousins in Meknes.

·

MBOUCHI's notes (10)
 
2009
common sens..
 
2007
PEACE AND LOVE..
RAMADAN MOUBARAK..
SAVE MOROCCAN ANIMALS..
Memory & Fragrance..
THE MOROCCAN DARIJA FOR ADVANCED..
right or not right..
LET'S GO..
THE TRUTH..
I'm afraid but not crazy..


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