Your email: Password [ reset ]
   -> create a personal or business account for free in seconds!




where moroccans click!


about · terms
PEOPLE
GROUPS
BUSINESSES
DISCUSSIONS
727 members
8 groups, 40 businesses
1140 discussions, 13544 comments

FILM.TV
rima raider
rabat Morocco
Share on facebook
88
comments.
movies featuring morocco
06:01:44 AM Tuesday Jan 27, 2009


hi all,
plz i need ur help guys, if u know any american movie featuring morocco except from Casablanca, Marakech Express and Babel
plz let me know
grateful for ur attention

The content of this page graphics, text and other elementsis Copyright 2007 prospective author, and Raioo, Inc., only when stated otherwise, and may not be reprinted or retransmitted in whole or in part without the expressed written consent of the publisher.



Where Moroccans Click!
Create an account in seconds
to start new topics, leave comments, express yourself, make Moroccan friends and Morocco-loving friends, build long lasting connections, buy and sell, join groups and events, share photos, cook, message, and more.





2:50 am    January 13, 2010

majhol majhol message
88
Je veux vendre des informations confidentielles trs important pour moi Isral, mon somme d'argent considrable on skyp ci gilver987

2:30 am    January 13, 2010

majhol majhol message
87
Je veux vendre des informations confidentielles trs important pour moi Isral, mon somme d'argent considrable on skyp ci gilver987

7:57 pm    May 19, 2009

karima karima message
86
83
back to movies, in the sheltering sky wt do u think of the scene with the prostitute? ( she's a tunisian woman not moroccan why this confusion?)

7:48 pm    May 19, 2009

karima karima message
85
83
plz latif can u post links to the forums that tackle moroccan representation in movies u talked about. i'd be very grateful

7:37 pm    May 19, 2009

karima karima message
84
83
hi latif i give u the permission to talk on my behalf with respect to this issue

8:07 pm    May 18, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
83
82
I can only speak for myself, and those are not my concerns. If you are happy for your fellow Moroccans and you by implication to be shown as flee bitten, backward and ignorant in every film ever made in Morocco; I would like to think that Moroccans are better than that.
Babel is singled out on this thread simply because most of the contributors used it as an example Moroccan image could have done without it being made. The same accusation could be laid at the door of most of the films made in Morocco. I have visited the page of Thoughts chase thoughts you recommended and all it seems to do is confirm my belief that Morocco image has been distorted and damaged by all those films, since no one on that blog has seen anything wrong with the Moroccan characters. There was mention of: I think that the entire trip to Mexico was a representation of how Americans view Mexico -- poor, dirty, and lawless. I would be very intrigued to find out what Mexicans think of Babel, you could always invite those who saw the film to comment on it. As for the Americans, you seem to have got them pretty much just how they are and you are not alone in that, since thoughts chase thoughts sees them in a very similar light. The Japanese should object if they are portrayed as something they are not, deaf people too should object to misrepresentation. However since the original note is about AMERICAN MOVIES FEATURING MOROCCO it is only natural that as a Moroccan I view the films from a Moroccan angle. I have come across many forums and blogs that see the representation of Moroccans in American films the way I do.
I dont expect anyone to exchange my view with theirs or vice-versa, I simply call it the way I see it and feel privileged to do so because I know there some people who cant voice their thoughts.

10:44 am    May 17, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
82
Latif and Karima, I tried to pick and summarize your concerns. You're really focused on 3 things: 1) the "Moroccans are terrorists" stereotype, 2) Hollywood's abuse of Morocco, and 3) Moroccan officials abuse of Morocco's image.

Great movies leave people discussing over tea and coffee and in websites, each pouring in a different interpretation. I cannot help but respect your anger against Babel if that's what you saw. I can't and shouldn't exchange your view with mine.

This page is a great discussion of Babel's Moroccan aspect. Another favorite page that goes into the abstract aspect of the movie, including a very light discussion of the first and third points I summarized above, is this blog:

Thoughts Chase Thoughts

You will have to read the post and all comments to get a better feel for how others saw Babel. Enjoy.

I wonder if the Mexicans are somewhere discussing how Babel amplifies the stereotypes that "Mexicans are Illegal". Mexicans nannies are irresponsible. Mexicans drive while drinking. Mexicans shoot fire in weddings. Mexicans drive in dirty roads. The stuff that the movie portrays.

I wonder if the Americans are somewhere discussing how Babel amplifies the stereotypes that "Americans are selfish". That they believe they can buy themselves out of any situation. That American husbands don't understand what their wives need. That Americans are always the victim. That they always win at the end. What I think Babel portrayed.

I wonder if the Japanese are somewhere discussing how Babel portrays them as irresponsible hunters. Or as a place where intake of ecstasy is common in public. I wonder if Deaf people are discussing how the movie portrays deaf people as sexually deprived, looking for acceptance by peers and not as cool. Willing to do anything to be accepted. Of course, in my mind, all are stereotypes, that the movie does not fail to portray and succeeds in triggering shock, discussion and communication. Restoring communication between the characters of the movie, and between the viewers. Perhaps that's where the title Babel comes from. The place that God divided into multiple communities unable to understand each other and in dire need of communication. In the blog above, there are interesting discussions about all of my questions. Would love to hear your opinion about it.


8:13 am    May 17, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
81
80
Hi Karima and thanks for the reply. The scene referred to in Babel was deliberately shot with a narrative so that the shooting could appear as random accident, but the hidden message is in your question: Why was the woman shot by Moroccan characters and not Japanese or Mexican? I saw in that scene the following message: Moroccan = Arab = Muslim = terrorist and lets face it that is how the West sees us and that image is partly painted by the portrayal of Moroccans, Arabs and Muslims in films.
My main objection to the film companies is that they go into Morocco, use and abuse all the facilities offered through Moroccan hospitality, no one in the Moroccan authorities exercises any editorial checks, the Moroccans used in these films- either as actors or extras -are given a bad image; yet these companies are allowed into the country again and again. Other countries have been known to turn film companies away because the story line of the film was not to their liking. I would like to know how many times did Morocco turn a film company away!
Your question about stereotypes is in my opinion academic since Moroccan actors are probably not shown any scripts or given access to story lines but they are simply directed to act the scenes and the editing does the rest. To be fair to the Moroccans, the income from the film industry is irresistible and makes up for the lack of local opportunities but that is no excuse for the film companies to take advantage of the situation. I think you have to be on the outside looking in to perceive these characters as stereotypes.

6:30 pm    May 15, 2009

karima karima message
80
79
i totally agree with u latif with my respect to ghalia's and Adnane's opinion (still weird to me). if it was meant to be an accidental gunshot, why wasn't kate(the heroine) shot by a japanese or mexican characters?
i read on an article in the internet that the two moroccan boys were chosen among hundreds of boys bcz their haunting faces stand out in the crowd and that moroccan actors were too "polished" (which i doubt) to take roles as such.
i ve another question if u allow me; do u think moroccans resist stereotypes being reproduced over & over again in hollywood or they dont since the majority doesnt even percieve these as stereotypes?

10:03 pm    May 13, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
79
Hi everyone,
When I watch films made in Morocco by Hollywood regardless of their cinematographic merit as a Moroccan they make very angry and I feel insulted. The boys (non actors) and the policeman (the only actor) in Babel did not stand in front of the camera and improvised their scenes, they were directed to do and say everything you saw on screen. The power of film is awesome; people believe what they see in these films and tend to think in term of clichs about people and places they are not familiar with. When I first visited the UK in the mid seventies most people asked about my camel or wanted to know what it was like to live under a tent in the desert because their knowledge of Morocco was based on what they saw in the Hollywood films.
Shooting films in Morocco is about as cheap as it gets. Hollywood will make films wherever they are cheap to make. I grant you the beauty of Morocco is one of the reasons film makers keep returning to MOLLYWOOD, as for the light and the geography I would not say they are unique to Morocco; any point on the globe at the same level as Morocco should have similar light and landscape qualities otherwise Hollywood can manufacture all that on a back-lot. The irony of it all is the films which were supposed to be about Morocco: Casablanca and the road to Morocco were actually made in Hollywood!
Now the UGLY word that is Hollywoods raison dtre which is the $$$$$$$ sign, please dont tell me that is not about money or that the Moroccans used in these films are given a fair pay. Have you not heard the terms BOX OFFICE or BLOCK BUSTER? When the budget details of the film SAHARA were leaked to the L. A. Times they showed payment of $23,250 for political/mayoral support in Erfoud (bribes), and $40,688 to stop a whole river improvement project in Azemmour, but to put that into some kind of context, this baksheesh pales next to the $72,800 paid to Matthew McConaugheys hair colourist for the duration of the shoot.

2:36 pm    May 9, 2009

ghalya houbbi message
78
1. About the talk on BABEL
I liked it, I did not feel it portrayed the boys (non-actors who did an amazing job) as terrorists at all. QUITE THE CONTRARY for me actually it was very obvious in the film it was simply an accident with boys' play in the picture and horsing around, guns are dangerous period, the reality sets in when the 'big shot' cop (the only 'actor') and his team did whatever they could to get those boys because all they 'heard' was that they shot an 'American'... so let that sit in our heads for a while... and 'get them' they did... so sad. I definitely agree with Adnane on the film.

2.About Scorsese
yes he shot many many films in Morocco he is fan of the film 'El hal' (Trances ABOUT Nass el ghiwane) and is friends with its director in Morocco. I know this because I've met the director. So I don't know about him wanting to make a movie about Nass ghiwane but he does love the film already made by Ahmed El Maanouni.
- Also it's not that cheap to shoot in Morocco, and the extras aren't necessarily paid less, they're paid good, they're smart those guys, we all know how us Moroccans can get if we're being cheated. lol so they know what they're worth and they have a lot of experience and production in morocco has a long history, so they know, trust me... and about shooting there, let's not forget the amazing LIGHT and sun we have there which is KEY in filming and heaven for a cinematographer, also geography wise it's close and convenient right across the atlantic, we have amazing landscapes, from everything and anything a director hopes for and dreams of...dunes, oceans, cliffs, mountains it's all in our beautiful Morocco and and the sun brightens every corner even more, so better for the camera to capture it all. it's just so ideal. so it' really not just about money...

* For anyone concerned or interested in how the work is with the extras playing in hollywood films or other productions in Morocco YOU MUST watch 'Ourzazate Movie' I saw it in new york when I visited my friend about 4 yrs ago, it's a documentary made by a Moroccan, so find it!! It was funny too... just an amazing look at this subject. Sorry in advance if this film was already mentioned down there by someone but i didn't have the time to read every post just got to 6 or 7 bottom up...Anyway it should be mentioned again :)

best to all :)


10:44 am    May 7, 2009

karima karima message
77
hia everyone, plz i ve a question for u: when you watched these movies do you feel misrepresented or does it feel just normal?

5:22 pm    April 20, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
76
Hello and welcome Karima. Better late than never! Finally somebody sees things the way I do. If you read back through the posts you'll find that I seemed to be fighting a loosing battle throughout this thread. I objected to film companies going into Morocco, bribe some of the officials, abuse most Moroccans they deal with, show Morroccans and Arabs in a poor light, shoot whatever script they like with no editing power excecised by anyone from Morocco. When they start promoting their films, they complain about been asked for bribes and have nothing negative things to say about Morocco and Moroccans, yet they are let back in time and time again.

8:25 am    April 18, 2009

karima karima message
75
hia everyone,
i'd like to go back to the original topic of the discussion, don't you think that moroccans (alongside the arabs and minority groups) are misrepresented in hollywood movies? for me i think they do portray moroccans as a people belonging to low culture where witchcraft, superstitions reign

3:35 pm    February 13, 2009

Salem message
74
I actually could type arabi strait into here with my keyboard where I am familiar with the arabic letters and using the windows language feature. Here is the transcript I am pleased to share with you:



...


...




...


3:30 pm    February 13, 2009

Salem message
73
I actually could type arabi strait into here with my keyboard where I am familiar with the arabic letters and using the windows language feature. Here is the transcript I am pleased to share with you:



...


...




...


7:18 am    February 12, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
72
Thanks Rima, I did what yoy suggeste and it worked. I now can see the Arabic text as it was meant to be seen, thanks again!

9:27 pm    February 11, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
71
Glad you like the poem Rasta. Maybe you can help me. After the word GIMMICKS and for the next eleven lines all I am getting on my screen is an undecipherable text. Do you think I need to download some plug-in or software to display the Arabic text? Thanks

8:17 pm    February 11, 2009

Rasta Gnawi message
70
Latif. are you kidding. the text traveled very well. I can't believe someone quoted a poem from Mruu lqayes. I love that poet. You brought tears to my eyes tonight old mate.

6:44 pm    February 11, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
69
OOPS MY ARABIC TEXT DIDN'T TRAVEL AT ALL!!! ANOTHER REASON FOR A RETHINK.

6:41 pm    February 11, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
68
Well, hush my mouth; forgive me for breathing dear Khedija. I didnt realise that snobbery was one of the criteria required to contribute to this forum. Thank you for allowing us to exist. Everyone is entitled to express an opinion, but ones freedom stops where someone elses freedom starts.
Thank you Adnane for the link to (YAMLI.COM). I have checked it out when you posted it first time round. I also visited the site suggested by Rasta (ARABIC-KEYBOARD), but I found them lacking on various aspects:
The Arabic text, when displayed appears like a very poor scanned page, the letters werent sharp.
The text was aligned to the left making it aesthetically unpleasant to those used to seeing Arabic text aligned to the right.
The following is a short poem thats been stuck in my head for years, I seem to be able to recall with ease I had to double check it on line just in case and with the exception of the odd missing word I seem to have managed to remember it
It took me forever to type these ten lines and I couldnt manipulate the text how I wanted, so I ended up copying & pasting the text from an Arabic site to arrive at this quality, which leads me to think that European computer hardware and software are not designed to be used with Arabic text. Yes you can produce Arabic text with the help of plug-ins and add-ons but they are nothing more than toys and gimmicks.










PS. When I prepared this on my word processor the poem was centered on the page but as you ca see it didn't travel very well.



3:55 pm    February 11, 2009
incoherent

khadija Ahmadi message
67
hi rima
I do not want to go into details,because all the group is not specialized on that field I guess u re a student in english lit
if u need information on linguistics i.e phonology, morphology,syntax,semantics.
so, u no wat it wud meyk layf iziyer

3:05 pm    February 11, 2009

youness yahya message
66
so i read in the news that Camilla belle is gonna be the main start actress in a new movie about the virgin Mary. Location of the movie? well Ouarzazate:)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0949757/
FYI.

3:05 pm    February 11, 2009

rima raider message
65
60
CORRECTION: it's called the international phonetic transcription my dear if u need further reference check out this link, u no wat it wud meyk layf iziyer http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/15/IPA_chart_2005.png

3:22 am    February 11, 2009

youness yahya message
64
hey guys back to al maoudou3e dial al aflame:)

6:42 pm    February 10, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
63
61
Latif, I posted a link earlier, not sure if you got it. Is this (yamli.com) what you have in mind?

6:41 pm    February 10, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
62
60
Oh nice! I can't believe at least someone in this language discussion is in sync with my thinking :)

5:10 pm    February 10, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
61

Hi everyone,
I am starting to think that if I was a bit unsure about the transcription before your contributions, now things are as clear as mud! The problem it seems to me is that we are trying to fit a round object in a square hole, and judging by the disagreements, the solution of replacing letters and sounds with numbers is not working well enough.
Is it time for a rethink? We shouldn't leave it to the likes of Microsoft and Google to solve it for us! How hard can it be?

3:26 pm    February 10, 2009

khadija Ahmadi message
60
50
hi rima
i am new in the group and i did read your commemt on what concerns the digits 2,3,4,5,6,7
I think that you are just complicating the transcription :i.e. just transcribe the word as one can hear it. So we need
= 3
=7
=h
=q
=T
=kh

I think this is the simplest, otherwise you can refer to the international transcription, i mean in linguistics


7:34 pm    February 6, 2009

Salem message
59
Thanks Rasta for the link to the arabic-keybord.org. Very practical and so easy. I've added it to my favourites right away. :)

8:05 am    February 6, 2009

rima raider message
58
55
thanks for the stubborn option it satisfies one's ego. anyway, still i have some reservation about the digit 5 and 2 because they were created exclusively for computer use since the old keyboard did not include arabic letters and people now are very much used to it
have a good day ALL

7:32 am    February 6, 2009

Rasta Gnawi message
57
Actually, having a small add-on in this site to allow us to write in Arabic letters would be great. Maybe having an icon on top of the edit box where you can click to change the text from english to Arabic. If Arabici chosen, then a small box with keys appears and you click with the mouse to get the letters you want. Kind of archaic, but a good start. Something similar to this but much more versatile.

http://www.arabic-keyboard.org/


7:26 am    February 6, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
56
53
Yes that is a great tool to have. My friend and I thought about it a long time ago but we never put our heads into it. At that time the japanese were already doing it. They would write in latin characters and they would see the words transform to japanese characters and words before their eyes. Fascinating! The Arabic version has been done recently. Check our the search engine YAMLI it's a wonderful tool. And just for giggles, rima will be happy because they do consider 8 as ha, 6 as tabla, 5 as khamssa. You can try out all numbers in meaningful words and see what they'd produce.

Off to work, allah yaqbel.


7:22 am    February 6, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
55
54
I am definitely being stubborn you're right, and because of that I am given you the stubborn choice in rate this comment :) try now. Yes 8 looks like our beloved Arabic ha, I guess I can let that one slip but I don't see myself adopting it, I'm just so used to ha, too late. My fingers have long been programmed, trust me it would be very difficult to unlearn. For the 5, complete no no, simply because it lacks the crown, the dot. I've been writing kh long before the internet were even born, it's clear, and it emphasizes the rough, exotic and proud sound it produces.

3:03 am    February 6, 2009

rima raider message
54
52
Adnane
I CERTAINLY DONT GET YOUR POINT. i dont know what's scary about 8 (see how beautiful) moreover it's almost similar to the arabic letter .
concerning 5 there's not only the word 5amsa that includes the letter , it's better to type one letter instead of two.
by the way i wish there was a "stubborn" option for "rate this comment" ;-D

11:21 pm    February 5, 2009

Salem message
53
The issue is not too big :) Although we may be a bit slow in deciphering Arabic words written in Latin (or Roman?) letters without the use of 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, we typically end up understanding what those words and expressions are about. We agree on the necessity of use of 3 an 7 and we can continue discussion with respect on things we don't agree upon yet. Hada fih Kheir!

The evolution of technology is fortunately very fast and hopefully in a near future we can shift easily from Latin to Arabic letters and back. Microsoft Windows has solved this problem to a certain extent, but people still don't use this feature much for some reason. Maybe one day, the text processor in Raioo will enable us to shift easily from Latin to Arabic letters and forth. What do you think Master Adnane? :)


6:34 pm    February 5, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
52
50
I respectfully disagree. h is strictly as in hakada yakounou. If you want to mean hbibi as in my lover, then what I'm saying is to use 7 as in 7bibi. really very simple, no need for the ugly and invading 8.. look at it, it's Scaring me as I type!

I find kh for khamssa w khmiss, sooooooo much better and easy on the eyes than 5, although 5 would be easier to type than the entire word khamssa :) but you get my point.

6 ? 6abla for tabla? still ugly and confusing.

I stick by my own rules which I don't enforce on anyone of course. 3 and 7, and repeat the letter for shadda.



11:27 am    February 5, 2009

Salem message
51
Good point Rima. I agree with you. Especially in cases like Alhawyya which could split in two different words/meanings : Al8awwya (hell) and Al7awyya... don't misunderstand me! In Arabic Al7awyya means the Container. Maybe for the letters q and K we can agree with Master Adnane as you said :)) Salaaam!

6:03 am    February 5, 2009

rima raider message
50
49
Adnane,
the digits 8, 6, 5, 9, and 2 are VERY NECESSARY. you know why? because ssometimes people may take your words far beyond your meaning like the word 8awiyya so it's better to use the digit 8 to avoid such a misunderstanding.
6 (6abla) it's better to use 6 to be separate from the letter '''' (ktab=book)
as for 5 (5amsa) it's better to use it rather than "kh"
for "q" i might agree with you ;-D

11:31 pm    February 4, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
49
47
All you folks need to know is this:

3 is 3in as in 3adnane.

7 is dwa la7mer (been ages since i last used it)

All is the other digits, 8, 6, 5, 9 are unnecessary complications I never bothered to learn or use.

h is what it is, hangar, hongar, house, une hanche, al hawiyya etc.

k is what it is, kafer bellah.

q as in lqourtass.

dh as in dhamir, dhahira... but we Moroccans usually morph it into just a d. as in dib, derbou

gh as in gharnati, belgha

t for both toulala and tabla.

for shadda, repeat the letter where shadda applies.



5:53 pm    February 4, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
48
45
While we are still on the subject of films, how about this for a coincidene:
Ben Barka film shown on Moroccan state TV

Two-part film depicts emblematic opposition figure's life from childhood to disappearance in France in 1965.


5:46 pm    February 4, 2009

Salem message
47
I know that :

8 represents the letter h like in "8adi8i laylati"
7 represents lhe letter h like in "Al7abib"

but I don't know which letter 6 represents. Anybody can you help? Thanks.


5:31 pm    February 4, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
46
45
Thanks Rima, That makes my life much easier. I'll keep them safe.

12:43 pm    February 4, 2009

rima raider message
45
38
Latif, here are the new transcriptions
= 3
=7
=8
=9
=6
=5
=2

12:43 pm    February 4, 2009

rima raider message
44
38
Latif, here are the new transcriptions
= 3
=7
=8
=9
=6
=5
=2

11:34 am    February 4, 2009

Salem message
43
The nice old days! :)

3:17 am    February 4, 2009

youness yahya message
42
Baba Salem:
cool:) i'll be waiting for the info. I'm more a movie watcher than a book reader:) i used to watch on Friday night back in the 90s the history documentaries on TVM and they use to start after 11. i used to sit in front of the tube all by myself specially we had world war I and II in the exams so i nailed the history exams in 6eme and Back.

12:24 pm    February 3, 2009

Salem message
41
Youness ~ I got that; and that's why I was pleased to react to it quickly. I love history like you, and I like to read novels made out of a blend of historical facts and fiction, like Shugan, a 1200 pages wonderful novel by James Clavell that tells Japan's history at a critical phase of its evolution. I enjoyed reading many others like the Moghul by Thomas Hoover that tells the history of India, and Redemption the novel of Irland, and also the Battle of Three Kings by Younes Nekrouf translated into Arabic by Wafa Wichou and Hussein Haidar, that is from my point of view, the "history" of Morocco. I'll be pleased to make a search on where and how I can find the Movie and tell you about as soon as I find something.


4:29 am    February 3, 2009

youness yahya message
40
Adnane:
kataskou 7atta kataskou ou mine kataktabe kataktabe bezzaf:)
Well adnane there is not only one film festival in Morocco and for Moroccans but there are many for the short and medium films, i don't have the exact number, BUT none of these movies are shown either on TV nor in Theaters across the country, and it's sad i know. Send me the script i know someone in the film industry and i might convince him to read it iwa hadi jahdi 3like a ba Adnane:).
BABA SALEM: i didn't know that was a movie made about "ma3rakete wal al makhazine" where can i see it? Because they never ever talked about it. I know the story of the by heart i'm a big fan of history in general and in Moroccan history in particular. Thanx for the info man.

7:43 pm    February 2, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
39
rima, one of my friends here on raioo and I, have screen written a short film. I had to learn how to write a script from various online resources. I learned the basics and we had a script waiting to be read. Our intention was to find a serious director and producer in Morocco to give our script wings. We were having difficult times just finding someone let alone have them read it. And so we sort of gave up for a while. Now I feel I should kick the effort again. It's a great short film, at least in my opinion, of about 13 min. We never published it on raioo because of copyright issues.

We wrote it because we are addicted to the culture of Morocco and North Africa in general. I think that if I were not North African, I would have somehow found my way there, moved and lived there. Our land is incredibly rich in culture, landscape and mystery. It is a shame that Moroccans are not yet able to reflect this in cinema. Our governments spend millions of dollars to attract tourists. If we had good cinema, films coming out on a monthly basis, implicitly advertising our land, the world will come to know Morocco more often. Morocco succumbs to every demand from Hollywood because Morocco is obligated to Hollywood. Casablanca put Morocco on the map and kicked off skyrocketing tourist numbers from the English world soon after it was released.

Rima said that Moroccans lack big pockets and technical depth to produce films. Some of the legendary films in America, Europe and Iran were low-budget independent films. Some made with no more than $10000. What is lacking as you accurately stated is a good script! a good film means breath-taking dialogue.

Why can't they (the geniuses running Morocco):

1. Use carrots and sticks and find a win-win situation with Hollywood financing and sponsoring film schools in Morocco?

2. Start a festival of Moroccan (North African) Short Films? Encourage media and art students and anybody with enough passion and drive.

3. Encourage story writers of all genre. Stories are a tradition of the Quran.

4. Allow the free flow of information, knowledge and humans between Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. Work hand in hand with our brethren. Algeria has legendary talent Moroccans can learn a great deal from. That's another topic in itself.


7:00 pm    February 2, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
38
RIMA. A thousand apologies Lalla Rima, Innocent mistake please forgive me. Adnane is not the only one to hijack your topic; it has appeared on another site. This subject will only benefit from a widening of the discussion. I think youve touched a raw nerve. As for going on strike, this is the wrong time to even mention strike!!!!
Before I go any further, I have a re quest to make. Could someone explain which letters in Arabic do the numbers represent? I think the 3 is and 9 is but if you could make me a list it would help with reading those words.
Youness, I cant recall saying that a script about Tarek Ibn Ziaed would land its writer in hot water, but one about THIS BLINDING ABSENCE OF LIGHT or one about Ben Barka might. I think you meant to say consummate. Maybe Moroccan film makers should be cynical and flood the market with all kinds of films, that way the practice will sharpen their skills, look at the film factories of Hong Kong, they started with some terrible films but recently they have produced some good ones

5:16 pm    February 2, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
37
I actually totally forgot to let you folks know that I had created yesterday a new discussion as an extension to this topic. But no big deal, you post your new comments wherever it makes sense to you.

2:19 pm    February 2, 2009

Salem message
36
Youness,

About 15 years ago, a great movie, of the standard you wished in one of your previous posts bellow, was made by a pioneer Moroccan movie maker. And guess what about! "Ma3rakat Wad El-Makhazen". The greatest movie maker ever known in Morocco who made it is "Souhail Benbarka". He made few movies but good movies, thematically sound and technically had nothing to envy to Hollywood movies.

He got to be known to the large public after he made his first movie "Mille et une mains" that addressed the issue of the use of little girls in making carpets to be sold to tourists. His second movie was "La Guerre du ptrole n'aura pas lieu" which was removed early from the marked after a complaint was made by the Saudies. His third movie "Amock" was about Apartheid in South Africa. He afterwards adapted the Garcia Lorca play "Bodas de Sangre" ( "Noces de Sang").

In his last movie "La Guerre des Trois Rois", Souhail Benbarka tells the story of Ma3rakat Wad El-Makhazen, where three kings lost their lives in a decisive battle near Kasar Lekbir in northern Morocco in the 16th century: King Abdelmalek Sadi, the former King (his brother) and King Sebastian of Portugal. During that big battle, King Sebastian and his huge army were trapped in the field of Wad El-Makhazen. The movie used, among other huge means, the contribution of the former Soviet Union navy.

Unfortunately, Souhail Benbarka stopped making movies after he was appointed Director General of the "Centre Cinmatographique Marocain".


9:06 am    February 2, 2009

youness yahya message
35
Well i haven't see any of these 2 movies yet, but i saw " samira fi aday3a" and it was about this city girl who married this farmer who was not able to consume his marriage if you know what i mean. So the girl seduces the husband's nephew and ..... It's a true story for a lot married couples nowadays in Morocco, but we don't talk about it openly (7chouma). The story is there but the delivery was mediocre. As for scripts, i don't see how can a script talking about Tarek Ibnou ziyaed would be his writer in Hot waters? If there was a movie to be made about Tarek than it will need a huge production not centimes and dhs. And i'm sure that NO ONE will want to put his money on this movie if it was to be directed by a Moroccan. NO CONFIDENCE AT ALL IN OUR PPL

8:38 am    February 2, 2009

rima raider message
34
oh guys did u see that Adnane had stolen my topic :'(
i'll go on a strike

8:26 am    February 2, 2009

rima raider message
33
31
AAAAAAAAAA i'm not ssi i'm a female

7:58 am    February 2, 2009
Ytoob alik!!

youness yahya message
32
Well i haven't see any of these 2 movies yet, but i saw " samira fi aday3a" and it was about this city girl who married this farmer who was not able to consume his marriage if you know what i mean. So the girl seduces the husband's nephew and ..... It's a true story for a lot married couples nowadays in Morocco, but we don't talk about it openly (7chouma). The story is there but the delivery was mediocre. As for scripts, i don't see how can a script talking about Tarek Ibnou ziyaed would be his writer in Hot waters? If there was a movie to be made about Tarek than it will need a huge production not centimes and dhs. And i'm sure that NO ONE will want to put his money on this movie if it was to be directed by a Moroccan. NO CONFIDENCE AT ALL IN OUR PPL

7:43 am    February 2, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
31
Ssi Rima,
My sentiment exactly! It is the lack of the basic infrastrucure that is keeping the Moroccan film makers behind. Morocco has talented people capable of writting a good script, but maybe they are afraid to put on paper thoughts and ideas that might land them in hot water, hence the obscurity you mentioned. If the authorities sponsored competions to find the best scripts, that might encourage some to deliver .
As for Casanegra and Amours voils I have not seen them yet and I'll take your word for it, so let's hope they can learn from those mistakes, after all even today's best film makers can misjudge a situation and make a TURKEY. May be for the time being Moroccan film makers should take a leaf from Bolywood's book and make films about social stories. Usually when people write about what they know, it seems to come across as honest and believable.

7:08 am    February 2, 2009

rima raider message
30
the moroccan film industry has come a long way undeniably; i think the problem with our film making is the lack of advanced technical resources as well as the lack of screenwriters. sometimes i watch a Moroccan movie till the end with no end at all not to mention the obscurity that prevail in most moroccan movies.
another complaint i have about moroccan movies is the use of vulgar scenes like the recent ones CASANEGRA and AMOURS VOILS (7ijab al7obb). i dont know what's the point behind such scenes; perhaps they want to attract a larger audience or to compete movies made by westerners :-P. but give me a good script and then i can overlook such scenes.

7:05 am    February 2, 2009

rima raider message
29
24
OBJECTION SSI Latif
with her permission ;)

5:45 am    February 2, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
28
I did say that Doukali was bad ! but he was only bad because we were comparing a film industry in its enfancy to an established and polished Holywood. Watch some old black & white Holywood films, they were terrible. Our films should represent us and tell our stories and if they are different to Holywood films, that would make them unique. Take Bolywood, I grew up watching Indian films. and the European film industry first dismissed Indian films but now they are copying Bolywood and SLUMDOG MILlIONAIRE is the proof.
You ask: What does Holywood know about Morocco? My anwser is ABSOLUTELY NOTHING, but what do they know about Mongolia? yet they made GHENGIS KHAN. What do they know about India? yet they made GHANDI. What do they know about their own hostory? yet they made WESTERNS portraying the Red Indians as savages.

4:53 am    February 2, 2009

youness yahya message
27
hahaha doukali as an actor hahaha i remember seeing him in an old egyptian movie called " wara'a a shams" "beyond the sun" it's sux big big time:).
i agree with you, but why Hollywood be interested in Making a movie about Morocco? Do they know the country? and if yes what do they know about it?
I was thinking since Jamal Dabouz and Said taghmaouti are really international famous actors and have a very good connections in the Hollywood industry, propose one story about Moroccan Historical figures for a movie to be made like "gladiator". Moroccan film industry just celebrate its 50th anniversary ( for me it should be amateur film industry). They can't make a movie as big as "Sahara" or " Gladiator" or even "les indigents" it's sad really sad.

4:19 am    February 2, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
26
25
Youness,
Those are excellent subjects for films and I'll pay top price to watch any of them. The only material I've seen about Ben Barka and Ibn Batoota were documentaries made by non-Moroccans, which brings me back to my original point about this: Holywood film makers are not interested in us and why should they? but when you see fims made about obscure stories from all over the world except certain specific places (ie Arab and Muslim) you start to wonder if there is an unpublicised censorship in place. That is why I want the revenue from all these films location fees to go to build Morocco's own film industry and tell own own stories. I know there is a film industry of sorts in Morocco because I am old enough to remember ABDUL WAHAB DOUKALI trying his hand at being an actor in the seventies, needless to say the film was bad and the acting was bad. With a good acting school and good studios we can learn, everuone else seems to come from behind us and overtake us, look at Indian film industry or BOLYWOOD as is is known, so why not MOLYWOOD soon?

2:45 am    February 2, 2009

youness yahya message
25
Hi:
Well Latif, i think they are 2 or more movies made about ben barka but by french directors not Americans. As for movies i would like to see made in Morocco and also about Morocco: Ibnou Batouta, Tarek bnou Zayed and the famous " Ma3rakte wad al makhazine" the quickest war in history if i'm not mistaken. The war ended in one day, Killing 3 kings and a prince. That's what i wanna see.

6:48 pm    February 1, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
24
Hello everyone,
How about expanding Rimas original note? - With his permission of course - Adnane has already suggested one direction the search could follow which was Music Videos I havent watched too many of those. I would like to suggest: Films you would like to see made in Morocco and mentioning the army made me think of a book I read recently, so I would like a film made based on the story in THIS BLINDING ABSENCE OF LIGHT and if someone could make a film about the short but full life of Ben Barka, Id watch those films.
THE LIVING DAYLIGHT (James Bond) was made in Morocco.
KUNDUN was a TURKEY made by M. Scorsese in 1997
I didnt know that Western Horror films needed a Moroccan location for their films, but apparently they do because THE HILLS HAVE EYES and THE HILLS HAVE EYES 2 were made in Morocco.
HOT NEWS: THE PPINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME is in production for release 2010.

6:28 am    January 31, 2009

youness yahya message
23
Latif:
:) now this is a lesson to remember. I didn't see any of these movies. Back to Somalia: When was the US army ever invited?:). They are always the victims the freedom fighters, the rescuers and so on...
Well as for the Moroccan army don't worry they don't wait for foreign movie makers to load its bank account:), and i can assure you that you will never see Housni ben slimane ( the general ) in a Movie:). As for me I'm always realistic and optimistic about Morocco. I don't think that there is a hidden agenda for those movie makers, Because for them Morocco is just another huge studio to shoot their movies and nothing else. May be and i say May be some of them have been pursed to come to Morocco to shoot their movies, and that's good in one way: expose ( good and bad) the film industry in Morocco.

5:58 am    January 31, 2009

youness yahya message
22
Latif:
:) now this is a lesson to remember. I didn't see any of these movies. Back to Somalia: When was the US army ever invited?:). They are always the victims the freedom fighters, the rescuers and so on...
Well as for the Moroccan army don't worry they don't wait for foreign movie makers to load its bank account:), and i can assure you that you will never see Housni ben slimane ( the general ) in a Movie:). As for me I'm always realistic and optimistic about Morocco. I don't think that there is a hidden agenda for those movie makers, Because for them Morocco is just another huge studio to shoot their movies and nothing else. May be and i say May be some of them have been pursed to come to Morocco to shoot their movies, and that's good in one way: expose ( good and bad) the film industry in Morocco.

8:05 pm    January 30, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
21
Sorry for coming in again. As a contrast to foreign films made in Morocco, how about a film made with North Africans as the main subject, the film tells the story of Algerians in the French army during the Second World War, you could very well switch nationalities since Moroccans also fought in the French army, the film is Days of Glory and I recommend it.

7:32 pm    January 30, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
20
Dear Youness,
First of all; correction: Body of Lies was a Ridley Scott film.
I didnt say that Scorsese liked or disliked Morocco. Scorsese has made films as far back as 1988 with The Temptation of Christ. However Moroccos relationship with Western film makers goes back to 1897 when the French director Louis Lumire made Le Chevrier Marocain.
What I find hard to believe is that for over a century with the exception of very rare occasions Moroccans are never shown in a good light. Should we be paranoid and say that there is a hidden agenda behind some of those films. As for payment, I am sure Morocco charges fees but you said it yourself Its cheap and I hope Morocco never needs its armed forces in a hurry, because theyll be too busy playing extras on film sets around the country.
Since you brought up Black Hawk Down, lets look at it: The film is based on real events. The US army goes into Somalia uninvited and without a justifiable reason; they interfere in local affairs and start a battle when their operation in Mogadishu fell apart. At the end the Rangers compromised UN peace keepers by asking them for an escort out of Mogadishu. The casualty figures seem to vary. The Americans put the number of Somalis dead at over 1000, the Red Cross figure only includes the civilians which were 200 and the Somalis claimed only 133 dead. The American figure for the Somali casualties is probably high to explain their own 18 dead. The film gave the impression that the Americans were bound by honour and duty to do what they did!
My real point is: It is not always about the financial price tag.

9:27 am    January 30, 2009

youness yahya message
19
18
you got me all wrong. I didn't say that he loves morocco that's why he came to shoot his movie. I just wanna say that beside that the director came to Morocco because it's cheap, Money talk.
and when i talked about publicity of course i didn't mean that shows the good of Morocco, they are other movies, like "Sahara" for example it shows the nature side of the country, and other that i can't pin point them right now.

8:38 am    January 30, 2009

rima raider message
18
17
please come on dont tell me that a certain director shot a film in morocco because he loves the country. a director will not bring a whole crew all the way from america to morocco were it not for the pursuit of an ideoligical agenda. if u read books on postcolonial theory you would know what i'm talking about. there's an interesting book tackling the issue of representation in movies called UNTHINKING EUROCENTRISM.
concerning the publicity you're talking about does it serve morocco? i doubt it. do u think that tourists would venture their lives and come visit morocco after seeing Babel, not many.

7:42 am    January 30, 2009

youness yahya message
17
Latif:
Well there tow versions to what you have written. Just to let you know, Scorsese loves Morocco and it wasn't the first that he comes to Morocco, He said that he comes very Often and he wants to do a movie about "NASS EL GHIWAN" with only Moroccan actors. i'll tell him good like in finding someone like or just close enough to BATMA.
The other point just that: Morocco charges fees for any foreign movie to be shot in Morocco and i got this from a very reliable source within the Moroccan film industry, yes there is the bribe factor, But they also pay good money for the + ( just about any Moroccan who appears in the movie). For example in the movie " Black hawk down) the extras where payed 100 DHS a day just to play dead or running in from of the camera. That's good in the Moroccan standers because if it was a Moroccan movie the best pay they could get is: M7archa with TEA:). In the movie babel, You can see how the Moroccan authorities went far beyond the borders to find out the origin of the rifle, and in real life that what happens. If you read the Moroccan news journals you'll see what i'm talking about.
Beyond these movies. Any movie made in Morocco is good for at least the publicity. And thanks to youtube and amateur Moroccan directors we can see the "other" Morocco that we don't see in the big screen, this way everything balances itself.

6:38 am    January 30, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
16
15
Thank You Youness for pointing out those facts about Babel because I was starting to wonder whether I watched a different film to the one Mr. Adnane must have seen through rose tinted glasses. Babel wasnt just about a random accident with fire arms but it was about the way the people reacted to that accident and the ripples created and went far beyond a remote little village in Africa. It is important to look at the Big Picture. Without presuming to know, I suggest that Mr. Adnane is just rattling a few chains to see what develops.
As for Body of lies, -Di Caprio is CIA working with Jordanian intelligence chief to stop a rumoured attack on America Dubai was the first location choice for the film, but the authorities there turned Scorsese down, but Morocco welcomed him with open arms, and if you think that these film makers are going to Morocco to discover the next star youll be disappointed. They couldnt care less, they arrive, bribe whoever they have to use and abuse the local resources and leave. I may view the matter differently if the Moroccan authorities charged a fee and used the money to better the conditions on the ground by building schools, hospitals and other infrastructure, but instead, the money goes in the back pockets of those who deserve it least.
In reality I agree with Nigel Andrews, the Financial Times critic who said Morocco in Western cinema is a place of the mind and suggests that Audiences prefer the fabricated versions of Morocco built on the Hollywood backlots to the real thing. Casablancas Bogey, Moroccos Dietrich and The Road to Moroccos Hope and Crosby never got a thousand miles from Africa.


3:05 am    January 30, 2009

youness yahya message
15
Adnane cousin:
Well you are wrong on one thing. Remember the police inspector? well he's a very well known international actor. He's name is Roukhi, he played in a couple of international movies. can't site one of them right now:). But KEEP IN MIND THAT THE COPS IN THE MOVIE ARE REAL COPS. In Morocco nobody is allowed to wear police uniform except police officers themselves, in that in mind, they are not actors at all. The kids were not portrayed as terrorists, But the movie was shot when Morocco had he's own problems with Terrorists. back in 2003 and 07, and also having a fire arm in Morocco without a license, just asking for problems. Here in Morocco Police don't play with this law, that's why in Movie they were very harsh and rude. Specially when they kick the crap out of the first couple to know who had the rifle.
We forgot one very special movie: ARRISALA ( THE MESSAGE), where morocco is Mekka. The movie speaks for itself and i have nothing else to add to it:).
and yeah another one "bed of lies" i think that's what it's called. Decaprio.

8:34 pm    January 29, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
14
11
I don't remember the details of Babel vividly, but I certainly disagree with your conclusion. I didn't come out from the theater feeling that the two boys were portrayed as terrorists. It was clear in the movie that it was an accident caused by a dangerous play with guns. This can happen anywhere in the world, and it does happen, and people can even die because someone was playing or cleaning a gun. The American couple had their own odd reasons to take a public transport bus, you don't see that very often. The screenwriter, perhaps inspired by cultures - and in our case by Morocco's deep mountains where even us Moroccans know little about - chose to make the storyline dramatic and fictional. But is it really far from reality or possibility? I don't think. I think he portrayed a village in Morocco accurately. Lack of basic health care. Belief in natural healers and wizards. And most important of all, people with kind and good hearts. People who outdid themselves to save the woman.

On top of this all, I found out later on that the main actors in the Moroccan thread of the story are regulars and not professional actors.

It just tells you something about the incredible expertise of foreign directors, producers and film staff. They are able to pick regular people, instruct and train them to act. And these people, who weren't worth much in the eye of Moroccan society can suddenly deliver a performance of a lifetime. A performance better than most professional Moroccans actors together.

So, I believe Morocco needs to host more and more movies unconditionally in hopes that young Moroccans who aspire to a career in film pick up foreign skills and use it to bring Moroccan cinema out of the dark ages.

Babel reminds me of the music video Do it Again by The Chemical Brothers filmed in Morocco. A wonderful piece of art featuring regular Moroccans. Check it out. rima, besides movies, you might get interested in music videos featuring Morocco. They are very artistic and interesting.



7:28 am    January 29, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
13
Hi Rima, Have seen how Moroccans are portrayed in Casablanca Marrakech Express even the more recent Babel.
I was rather pointing to fact that Morocco is blas about political sensitivities, as long as the dollars keep coming no one cares about editorial responsability. Other countries insist to see a script or a story line and demand that their country and people are not to play roles nobody else would accept. I'll only talk about Babel as an exemple:
How many tourists would like to go to Morocco to be shot in their tour bus? How about yor local cop besting up a young child? Or the autorities hindering the rescue of an injured woman in remote area. We all know that Moroccans are dirt poor, but do we really have to show them living in a hovel in every film made in their country. Morocco is so obliging to the film makersthe army is hired out as extras, and all this for what? Here is something I came across on line:
This is a country that simply cant do enough to make the cameras roll smoothly, just so long as the money flows in. When the detailed budget for the 2005 action movie Sahara was leaked to the Los Angeles Times, it revealed payments for $23,250 for political/mayoral support in Erfoud, and $40,688 to stop a river improvement project in Azemmour. The budget even included line items for local bribes, although the producers later claimed that this money was never spent. But to put that into some kind of context, this baksheesh pales next to the $72,800 paid to Matthew McConaugheys hair colourist for the duration of the shoot. I appologise if I am harsh about the old country but that is because I want better for it.

6:02 am    January 29, 2009

rima raider message
12
9
thanx latif but there are movies where morocco stands for itself
Babel
Marakech Express
Casablanca
the movies you cited feature Morocco only for the landscape and the intensity of light among other reasons.

5:56 am    January 29, 2009

rima raider message
11
10
i'm talking about the way the two Moroccan boys are portrayed as terrorists at least in my view. the movie as a whole serves to demonize the other including moroccans, mexicans and japanese and to depict america as the victim.

7:26 pm    January 28, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
10
6
I disagree. I thought Babel was great! and the representation of Morocco was subjectively possible. What is it that you found shocking?

7:07 pm    January 28, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
9
In Alexander Morocco was Persia
In Othello it was Cyprus
In Lawrence of Arabia it was Saudi Arabia
In Patton it was Battle fields of Europe in WW II
In the jewel of the Nile it was Egypt
In the Mummy it was Egypt
In Gladiator it was Ancient Algeria
In Rules of Engagement it was Yemen
In Black Hawk Down it was Somalia
In The last Temptation of Christ it was the Holy Land
In Rendition it was Guantanamo
In Hideous Kinky it was Marrakech (Sorry Peter)
Morocco ha rarely appeard as itself

6:09 pm    January 28, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
8
In "Lawrence of Arabia" Morocco was Saudi Arabia
In"Kingdom of Heaven" Morocco was The Holy Land
In "Alexander"

6:09 pm    January 28, 2009

Latif Nfoukh message
7
In "Lawrence of Arabia" Morocco was Saudi Arabia
In"Kingdom of Heaven" Morocco was The Holy Land
In "Alexander"

4:00 pm    January 28, 2009

rima raider message
6
thanks guys i really never came across the movie the man who would be king, i'll try to download it. i've seen Babel & it's really SHOCKING concerning the representation of moroccans.

1:43 pm    January 28, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
5
4
I just saw The man who would be king the other day. It was indeed shot in Morocco. Such a strange film, but good for a summer afternoon. The Moroccan actors were instructed to speak this fictional language made up of subtle Arabic references. The story takes place in India and somewhere near Afghanistan so I doubt it fits what the original poster is looking for. Nice movie though.

1:34 pm    January 28, 2009

peter white message
4
the man who would be king was filmed in the atlas mountains.Ouzazate is the location for many films,but you probably know about that.ah just remembered HIDEOUS KINKY is set in Tangiers

12:56 pm    January 28, 2009

youness yahya message
3
one word:
BABILON

7:03 pm    January 27, 2009

Rasta Gnawi message
2
Hi,

what about the third Bourne movie (I think the Bourne Supremacy or something like that.)

Ishtar is a great movie, it's all about Morocco, but it's an alternate reality Morocco.


6:55 pm    January 27, 2009

Adnane Ben. message
1
There are several. Are you looking for:
A. films that feature Morocco as a part of the storyline?
B. use Morocco as a location but the storyline takes place in a different land?

For A, I can think of the following for now:

- The man who knew too much
- Ishtar
- The Sheltering sky
- The wind and the lion

For B, there are too many to mention although I doubt you're interested in this category.


rima raider's notes (1)
 
2009
movies featuring morocco..


FAVORITES
.
.






about raioo ~ terms
All contents copyright 1999-2017 for Adnane Benali and respective authors. Aside from properly referencing and linking content, No duplication, reproduction, or reprinting of raioo writings, artwork and/or related content allowed without written permission from the respective author or publisher (raioo.com).

where moroccans click!