Your email: Password [ reset ]
   -> create a personal or business account for free in seconds!




where moroccans click!


about · terms
PEOPLE
GROUPS
BUSINESSES
DISCUSSIONS
727 members
8 groups, 40 businesses
1140 discussions, 13544 comments

MOROCCO
Blooming Warda
New York USA
Share on facebook
18
comments.
Moroccan City Names
02:37:49 PM Thursday Nov 8, 2007


Dear Raiooers

I was just reading somewhere that Americans in the movie industry, those who shot few movies in Morocco, joke around and call Ouarzazate "Where is it At". So, I became instantly interested in discovering the meanings of such names such as: Ourzazate, Ourika, Agadir, Lagouira, Tata, Oulmes, etc....

Please feel free to suggest other names and help translate each Moroccan city name, or even the story behind it. It is very sad that we Moroccans do not know the meanings of lots of vocabulary or names we use in our daily dialect.

So as a start, what does Ourzazate mean?


The content of this page —graphics, text and other elements—is © Copyright 2007 prospective author, and Raioo, Inc., only when stated otherwise, and may not be reprinted or retransmitted in whole or in part without the expressed written consent of the publisher.



Where Moroccans Click!
Create an account in seconds
to start new topics, leave comments, express yourself, make Moroccan friends and Morocco-loving friends, build long lasting connections, buy and sell, join groups and events, share photos, cook, message, and more.





9:53 am    December 7, 2007
lily
18
hello
·

9:52 am    December 7, 2007
lily
17
hello
·

2:38 pm    November 14, 2007
Baba Salem
16
And Bergam (Bergant) now 3in Beni Mat8ar.
·

11:40 am    November 13, 2007

Salem message
15
During and some time after the french protectorate, we had cities called : Bitija (Petit Jean) now Sidi Kacem, Oujjanti (Louis Gentil) now Al-Youssoufia, ... and other names I forgot.

We also had practices called: Rafache (Revanche), Lguirra (la Guerre),..

and things and events called: Saba (ça va) when the harvest is excellent, Lmoubita (le mauvais temps) when the ocean is furious,...

From the northern region formerly under spanish occupation, we got: Rouina (Ruina or Ruines) which translates to chaos or mess, Rouaida (Rueda or Roue) which is a tyre, and Lfijta (la fiesta or la fête) which translates to feast or celebration.

Regulation of giving names to babies has been enforced few years ago after families started giving names to babies like: Guadeloupe, Samantha or Federico or Sebastian under influence of translated to Arabic South American TV series...

Yes and some very \"political\" berberophones (note I don\'t say Berbers or Amazigh because nobody knows who arab is and who is not, who is amazigh and who is not: there are only Moroccans from different origins, some are arabophones and others are berberophones), they give names like Massine or Al-kahina to their babies. It is historically known that Al-Kahina was an amazigh leader who resisted islamic armies. So when one gives a name like Al-Kahina to his or her daughter, it is obviously a challenging attitude towards a specific part of the nation!

And there are those who give names under western influence (basically Jews\' names) like Sarah, Miriam (different from Meryem or Mariam). To these names there was a resistance too.

And those who give names to babies under influence of a nationalist struggle like in Palestine when they gave names like Yafa, Haifa (two cities under Israeli occupation) or Fedwa named after the famous palestinian poet \"Fadwa Taou9an\". These girls are now in their twenties.

Of course there are so many non arab male names that were borrowed from Al-9or2an, names of sacred prophets like : Ya3koub (Jacob), Ayoub (Job), Is7a9 (Isaak), Youssef (Josef) or Zakaria (Zachariah), names which are shared with jews and christians. Although there is normally no legal problems with these names in the new regulations, people prefer to give modern arab names to the new generation of babies.

In conclusion of my comment, giving names to babies and nicknames to older than babies, to events, to things, to places and to cities cannot escape the influence of dominant political, social and/or economic rule.

However, I think that people should be careful when they give names to babies in particular, as those babies do not participate in this process and for some reason may not like their names later on when the get older.

·

10:02 am    November 13, 2007

hudhud message
14
What do you mean "not allowed to name their children Massinissa or al kahina" ? is this literally enforced?! that's ridiculous. not that I find those names very attractive, but still, if you want to name your kid wolfgang or witch no one should have the right to stop you.

btw - I always thought Oujda came from asl ouijdane. I guess I was totally off. Place names throughout history have always played some role in politics. The French changed a lot of place names during colonialism, and after independence some of these place names changed yet again rather than reverting to their old names. All across the map of Africa this has happened. Zaire / Congo is a good example of the politics behind place name changes

·

1:34 pm    November 12, 2007

abdelilah message
13
Very interesting question warda. The names of cities is very political in Morocco. For instance Oujda comes from the amazigh "ou jidda" but the nationalist Arabophones trace the origin to the word "woujida" which means to be found in Arabic. Casablanca or Anfa was named Tamesna and it changed its name. In the same way that Moroccans are not allowed to name their children Massinissa or al kahina, cities get as much as they can Arabic names even if the majority of them have amazigh names like Tetouan from "iditawen" meaning eyes in Rifiyya.
·

10:02 am    November 12, 2007

hudhud message
12

check out this website on Amazigh Toponymy it's reallllllly cool :)

"Chaouen: Name of a beautiful town in the Rif mountains (north of Morocco). The name is derived from the word "icc" or "iccew," depending on the idiom, (plural iccawen) meaning "peak" or "horn" in Tamazight. Many places in North Africa bear names based on this root, for example Tichy in Algeria and Tichit in Mauretania which derive from the diminutive "Ticcit," (little horn). In fact, above the village of Tichy, there is a little hill that looks like a small horn. "

(which is quite accurate as I've seen pictures of it from my cousins' summer vacations in Tichy, Bedjaia)

My word of the day is Tassili n'Ajjer. apparently tassili means plateau and ajjer means bull. there are a lot of pre-historic rock paintings of bulls, wildlife and hunters in the region. it must've once been quite lush and green. Plateau of the Bulls.

choufti ya Warda wach taqadri tssibi fi google? wa la'in ra'a Sibawayh ma youmkinou attahassoula 3alayhi 3an ttareeqati google, lakaana akthara shay'in 3ajaba... :)

·

9:58 pm    November 11, 2007

Antr McShaddad (Yahia.L) message
11
Rasta-

hehehe

----------------

ps: Are you saying that your cat was posessed ? :)

·

7:17 pm    November 11, 2007

Rasta Gnawi message
10
I had a cat called wujda. we called her wuji. so Antr, you're on to something.
·

8:38 am    November 11, 2007

Antr McShaddad (Yahia.L) message
9
I know I am doing the reverse of what you guys are talking about...but
I read the Ouiji board name might have been inspired by Oujda.

Is Oujda known of occult practices ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouija

·

12:51 pm    November 10, 2007
MB
8
7
Actually, Agadir means the Attic...it refered to where people would store grains ...etc....at least that\'s what my berber granma said:)
·

7:18 pm    November 9, 2007

Adnane Ben. message
7
6
I recall now that Agadir means fortified house, probably in reference to the kasbahs of the south. Here's an interesting source:

"Geryon lived on an island called Erythia (Red Land), which was near the boundary of Europe and Libya. It was called Gadira by the Phoenicians, now Cadiz. According to Pliny, the name is derived from a Punic word gadir, meaning “hedge.” The same word agadir is still used in the south of Morocco in the sense of “fortified house,” and many places in that country bear the name. Amongst them the port of Agadir is the best known. "

·

6:50 pm    November 9, 2007

Blooming Warda message
6
4
you're funny hudhud. Your contribution to Arabic makes Sibawaih very jealous but thank you for the link though. So if Ourzazate means "without noise" what does Taza, Agadir, Tata, Zerhoun... mean? Hal Ogawguil hatta a3thora 3la eljami3i fi google. I'd like everybody's help to bring all info from google, wikepedia or other to RAIOO, it should be the "source"
·

3:45 pm    November 9, 2007

Adnane Ben. message
5
3
I was just joking actually :) but I really liked the sense of humour of those Americans.

Figuig: or Fijij, from Arabic Faj --> small mountain pass or hill pass, a small valley or saddle point.

·

2:24 pm    November 9, 2007

hudhud message
4
google* ya Warda, google :o) koulchi kayen fil internet! this site says that ourzazate means without noise but interestingly enough to say the word you gotta make some noise too..

*google: fi3l moudari3 aslouhou kalimatoun a3jamiyatoun laa 3alaqata lahou billoughati al ingleeziyah raghma isti3malihi fi lahjati soukkani shamal amrika. googla, yougougilou, googelan wa tagleelan... youqalou googla arrajoulou ithaa bahatha 3an shay'in bijedd fawajadahou.

since we're on the topic of place names that have lots of "zzz" in them here's another interesting one

·

1:07 pm    November 9, 2007

Blooming Warda message
3
1
So Adnane B.
if what you'r saying is true, how come that the naming of the city is English and not Amazigh, Arab, French or even Spanish. I believe our culture is more influenced by these cultures since the establishment of a country called Maghrib. The English or American influence is very recent. Are you telling me that Ourzazate did not exist until World War I or II, when USA decided to establish an army base in Kenitra? I do not really buy your explanation. Let's go deeper. I wish some of our compatriots who speak Amazigh would be able to enrich our knowledge and share the keys to these mysterious names.
·

9:29 am    November 9, 2007

hudhud message
2
interesting question and topic. i've always been interested in the meaning of names. so what does Taza mean? anyone know?
·

3:44 pm    November 8, 2007

Adnane Ben. message
1
Warda, Ouarzazate really means Where is it At, those Americans weren't joking! :)
·

Blooming Warda's notes (2)
 
2007
Moroccan City Names..
New government..


FAVORITES
Moroccan Christians
.
.






about raioo ~ terms
All contents © copyright 1999-2017 for Adnane Benali and respective authors. Aside from properly referencing and linking content, No duplication, reproduction, or reprinting of raioo writings, artwork and/or related content allowed without written permission from the respective author or publisher (raioo.com).

where moroccans click!